Routing for UAS378

currentage := calcAge(dateofbirth_year, dateofbirth_month, dateofbirth_day)
Fill code of question 'FLAge' executed
c_intro
In this survey you will be asked to answer some questions about financial knowledge, financial decisions, retirement plans, and the effects of the Coronavirus.
a001 (physical health)
Would you say that, in general, your physical health is:
1 Excellent
2 Very good
3 Good
4 Fair
5 Poor
98 Don't know
a002 (good at dealing with day to day financial matters)
How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

"I am good at dealing with day-to-day financial matters, such as checking accounts, credit and debit cards, and tracking expenses."
1 Strongly disagree
2 Disagree
3 Somewhat disagree
4 Neither agree nor disagree
5 Somewhat agree
6 Agree
7 Strongly Agree
98 Don't know
a003 (how satisfied with current financial situation)
Overall, how satisfied are you with your current financial situation?
1 Extremely satisfied
2 Very satisfied
3 Somewhat satisfied
4 Not very satisfied
5 Not at all satisfied
98 Don't know
a004 (compared to 2020 how satisfied with current financial situation)
Compared to Spring 2020, are you more satisfied or less satisfied with your current financial situation?
1 Much more satisfied
2 More satisfied
3 About the same
4 Less satisfied
5 Much less satisfied
98 Don't know
if currentage = empty then
currentage (current calculated age)
What is your age?
RANGE 45..76
End of if
Group of questions presented on the same screen
a005 (percent chance live to age)
What is the percent chance that you will live to be age [80/85]?
a005_dk (dont know percent chance live to age)


OR
1 Don't know
slider_script
End of group of questions
a006 (rate current credit record)
How would you rate your current credit record?
1 Very bad
2 Bad
3 About average
4 Good
5 Very good
98 Don't know
a007 (how confident cope with no labor earnings)
How confident are you that you could cope if you did not have any labor earnings for the next 3 months?
1 I am certain I could cope
2 I could probably cope
3 I probably could not cope
4 I am certain I could not cope
98 Don't know
a008 (confident come up with 2000 dollars)
How confident are you that you could come up with $2,000 if an unexpected need arose within the next month?
1 I am certain I could come up with the full $2,000
2 I could probably come up with $2,000
3 I could probably not come up with $2,000
4 I am certain I could not come up with $2,000
98 Don't know
a009 (confident come up with 400 dollars)
How confident are you that you could come up with $400 if an unexpected need arose now?
1 I am certain I could come up with $400
2 I could probably come up with $400
3 I could probably not come up with $400
4 I am certain I could not come up with $400
98 Don't know
a010 (how difficult cover expenses)
How difficult is it for you to cover your expenses and pay all your bills right now?
1 Very difficult
2 Somewhat difficult
3 Not at all difficult
98 Don't know
a011 (thinking about finances makes anxious)
How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

"Thinking about my personal finances can make me feel anxious."
1 Strongly disagree
2 Disagree
3 Somewhat disagree
4 Neither agree nor disagree
5 Somewhat agree
6 Agree
7 Strongly agree
98 Don't know
a012 (time spent on issues related to your personal finances)
How much time do you currently spend thinking about and dealing with issues and problems related to your personal finances? Please report approximate hours per week.
RANGE 0..168
if a012 > 0 then
a013_maximum := a012
if a013_maximum = empty then
a013_maximum := '0'
End of if
a013 (time spent at work on issues related to your personal finances)
How many of these hours occur at work? Please report approximate hours per week.
RANGE 0..^a013_maximum
End of if
bh_intro
Next, we turn to some scenario-based questions.
if bh_randomizer = empty then
bh_randomizer := getBehaviorRandomizer()
if bh_randomizer = empty then
bh_randomizer := mt_rand(1,4)
bh_randomizer_flag := 2
Else
bh_randomizer_flag := 1
End of if
End of if
if bh_randomizer = 1 then
r1_b1 (scenario 1 group 1)
Consider the following scenario: Jack and Jill are twins. At age 20, Jack started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when he was age 40, he stopped adding to his savings but left the money in the account. Jill didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Jack and Jill earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Jack
2 Jill
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r1_b2 (scenario 2 group 1)
Mary put away $1,000 at age 25 after finishing her Master’s degree and she promised not to touch it for many years. She was able to invest in a stock mutual fund with an annual return of 7%. She is now 55 years old. How many times did her initial amount double since she invested at age 25? Select one choice.
1 2 times
2 3 times
3 10 times
98 Don't know
r1_b3 (scenario 3 group 1)
Suppose you are a member of a stock investment club. This year, the club has about $200,000 to invest in stocks and the members prefer not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your fellow members? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r1_b4 (scenario 4 group 1)
Rita must choose between two job offers. She wants to select the job with a salary that will afford her the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B won’t give her a raise for the next few years. If Rita chooses Job A, she will live in City A. If Rita chooses Job B, she will live in City B. Rita finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on her concerns about standard of living, what should Rita do? Select one choice.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: she will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 2 then
r2_b1 (scenario 1 group 2)
Suppose you are a member of a stock investment club. This year, the club has about $200,000 to invest in stocks and the members prefer not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your fellow members? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r2_b2 (scenario 2 group 2)
Imagine that you‘ve been with NewTech Inc. for the past ten years and just got a $5,000 bonus since the company is doing so well. Thrilled about the bonus, you’re thinking about investing it in the stock market. You never invested before but want to use this bonus to start saving for retirement. What option should you choose? Select one choice.
1 Investing in NewTech Inc. as you love working with the firm and see first-hand that the business is doing very well
2 Investing in a technology index fund that tracks the performance of 340 technology stocks
3 Investing in a diverse fund that holds shares of companies across the energy, financial services, health care, leisure, and technology sector
98 Don't know
r2_b3 (scenario 3 group 2)
Consider the following scenario: Jack and Jill are twins. At age 20, Jack started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when he was age 40, he stopped adding to his savings but left the money in the account. Jill didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Jack and Jill earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Jack
2 Jill
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r2_b4 (scenario 4 group 2)
Rita must choose between two job offers. She wants to select the job with a salary that will afford her the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B won’t give her a raise for the next few years. If Rita chooses Job A, she will live in City A. If Rita chooses Job B, she will live in City B. Rita finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on her concerns about standard of living, what should Rita do? Select one choice.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: she will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 3 then
r3_b1 (scenario 1 group 3)
Rita must choose between two job offers. She wants to select the job with a salary that will afford her the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B won’t give her a raise for the next few years. If Rita chooses Job A, she will live in City A. If Rita chooses Job B, she will live in City B. Rita finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on her concerns about standard of living, what should Rita do? Select one choice.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: she will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r3_b2 (scenario 2 group 3)
Adele is 50 years old and is discussing three investment opportunities with a friend. She has already put aside a good sum of money and wants to invest it for the next 10 years, after that she will take an early retirement and move to Florida. She wants to play it safe, so she could invest in a) a saving account that pays 1% per year, b) a T-bill that pays 1.5% per year, or c) a certificate of deposit that pays 2%. The current inflation rate is 2.5% and expected to stay at that level. Her friend tells her that if she invests in this way, she will not be able to buy the same things she can afford today with the sum of money she has in 10 years. Which of the following is correct?
1 Her friend is right
2 Her friend is wrong
3 We cannot tell with this information
98 Don't know
r3_b3 (scenario 3 group 3)
Consider the following scenario: Jack and Jill are twins. At age 20, Jack started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when he was age 40, he stopped adding to his savings but left the money in the account. Jill didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Jack and Jill earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Jack
2 Jill
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r3_b4 (scenario 4 group 3)
Suppose you are a member of a stock investment club. This year, the club has about $200,000 to invest in stocks and the members prefer not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your fellow members? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 4 then
r4_b1 (scenario 1 group 4)
Consider the following scenario: Jack and Jill are twins. At age 20, Jack started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when he was age 40, he stopped adding to his savings but left the money in the account. Jill didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Jack and Jill earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Jack
2 Jill
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r4_b2 (scenario 2 group 4)
Mary put away $1,000 at age 25 after finishing her Master’s degree and she promised not to touch it for many years. She was able to invest in a stock mutual fund with an annual return of 7%. She is now 55 years old. How many times did her initial amount double since she invested at age 25? Select one choice.
1 2 times
2 3 times
3 10 times
98 Don't know
r4_b3 (scenario 3 group 4)
Suppose you are a member of a stock investment club. This year, the club has about $200,000 to invest in stocks and the members prefer not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your fellow members? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r4_b4 (scenario 4 group 4)
Imagine that you‘ve been with NewTech Inc. for the past ten years and just got a $5,000 bonus since the company is doing so well. Thrilled about the bonus, you’re thinking about investing it in the stock market. You never invested before but want to use this bonus to start saving for retirement. What option should you choose? Select one choice.
1 Investing in NewTech Inc. as you love working with the firm and see first-hand that the business is doing very well
2 Investing in a technology index fund that tracks the performance of 340 technology stocks
3 Investing in a diverse fund that holds shares of companies across the energy, financial services, health care, leisure, and technology sector
98 Don't know
r4_b5 (scenario 5 group 4)
Rita must choose between two job offers. She wants to select the job with a salary that will afford her the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B won’t give her a raise for the next few years. If Rita chooses Job A, she will live in City A. If Rita chooses Job B, she will live in City B. Rita finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on her concerns about standard of living, what should Rita do? Select one choice.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: she will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r4_b6 (scenario 6 group 4)
Adele is 50 years old and is discussing three investment opportunities with a friend. She has already put aside a good sum of money and wants to invest it for the next 10 years, after that she will take an early retirement and move to Florida. She wants to play it safe, so she could invest in a) a saving account that pays 1% per year, b) a T-bill that pays 1.5% per year, or c) a certificate of deposit that pays 2%. The current inflation rate is 2.5% and expected to stay at that level. Her friend tells her that if she invests in this way, she will not be able to buy the same things she can afford today with the sum of money she has in 10 years. Which of the following is correct?
1 Her friend is right
2 Her friend is wrong
3 We cannot tell with this information
98 Don't know
End of if
c0_intro
The following questions ask about your retirement plans and behaviors.
c001 (currently retired)
Are you currently retired?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if c001 in [1,98] then
c002 (made plan for how much money needed)
Before you retired, did you make a plan for how much money you needed in retirement?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if c002 in [1,98] then
c003 (retirement lifestyle close to what happened)
Is your retirement lifestyle close to what you had planned?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
End of if
Else
c004 (ever try to figure out how much needed for retirement)
Did you (and your spouse/partner) ever try to figure out how much you need to save for retirement?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if c004 = 1 then
c005 (change saving plan due to pandemic)
Did you change your retirement saving plans over the last year due to the pandemic?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if c005 = 1 then
c006 (increase or decrease retirement saving amount)
Did you increase or decrease your planned retirement saving in the last year?
1 Increase
2 Decrease
98 Don't know
End of if
End of if
c007 (changed expected retirement date)
Since Spring of 2020, have you changed your expected retirement date?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if c007 = 1 then
c008 (expected retirement age increase or decrease)
Did your expected retirement age increase or decrease, and by how many years?
1 Increase
2 Decrease
98 Don't know
Fill code of question 'FLIncrease' executed
if c008 in [1,2] then
c008_years (years expected retirement age increase or decrease)
By how many years did your expected retirement age [increase/decrease]?
1 1 year
2 2 years
3 3 years
4 4 years
5 5 or more years
End of if
End of if
End of if
d_intro
Please answer these four short questions related to personal finance concepts.
d001 (how much in account if left to grow)
Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2% per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow?
1 More than $102
2 Exactly $102
3 Less than $102
98 Don't know
d002 (how many years to pay off loan)
Suppose you owe $1,000 on a loan and the interest rate you are charged is 20% per year compounded annually. If you didn't pay anything off, at this interest rate, how many years would it take for the amount you owe to double?
1 Less than 2 years
2 At least 2 years but less than 5 years
3 At least 5 years but less than 10 years
4 At least 10 years
98 Don't know
d003 (buying single stock safer return than mutual fund)
Buying a single company's stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.
1 True
2 False
98 Don't know
d004 (how much in savings account with interest)
Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1% per year and inflation was 2% per year. After 1 year, how much would you be able to buy with the money in this account?
1 More than today
2 Exactly the same
3 Less than today
98 Don't know
e_intro
For the next questions, think about all of your household’s current debts, including mortgages, bank loans, student loans, money owed to people, medical debt, past-due bills, and credit card balances that are carried from prior months.
e001 (how manageable household debt)
As of today, which of the following statements describes how manageable is your household debt?
1 Have a manageable amount of debt
2 Have a bit more debt than is manageable
3 Have much more debt than is manageable
4 Have no debt
98 Don't know
if e001 in [1,2,3,98] then
e002 (has debt increased)
Since Spring of 2020, has your debt increased?
1 Yes
2 No - it has decreased
3 No - my debt stayed the same
98 Don't know
if e002 = 1 then
Group of questions presented on the same screen
e003 (reason for increase in debt)
The main reason for the increase in my debt is:
1 Loss of job
2 Reduced working hours
3 Spent all of my savings
4 Higher medical expenses
5 Higher expenses overall
6 Other, please specify:
98 Don't know
e003_other (other reason for increase in debt)
STRING
End of group of questions
End of if
e004 (debt delayed or prevented from saving retirement)
Has this debt delayed or prevented you from saving for retirement?
1 Yes
2 No
3 I'm already retired
98 Don't know
e005 (debt delayed or prevented from retiring)
Has this debt delayed or prevented you from retiring from work?
1 Yes
2 No
3 I'm already retired
98 Don't know
e006 (debt delayed or prevented from receiving medical treatment)
Has this debt delayed or prevented you from receiving medical treatment (including filling prescriptions)?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
e007 (currently have auto loan)
Do you currently have an auto loan?
1 Yes
2 No
3 I don't have a car
98 Don't know
e008 (currently have student loans)
Do you currently have any student loans?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
e009 (currently have mortgages)
Do you currently have any mortgages on your home?
1 Yes
2 No
3 I don't own a home
98 Don't know
if e009 = 1 then
e010 (received permission to delay or reduce payments)
Since Spring 2020, have you received permission from your lender to delay or reduce payments on your mortgage?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
e011 (missed or delayed payment mortgage)
Since Spring 2020, have you missed or delayed payment on your mortgage, or did you pay less than the full amount?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
End of if
if e009 != 3 then
e012 (have any home equity loans)
Do you have any home equity loans?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
End of if
e013 (carry over balance on credit card)
Since Spring 2020, did you carry over a balance on your credit card and end up being charged interest?
1 Yes
2 No
3 I don't have a credit card
98 Don't know
End of if
f_intro
Next, we are interested in learning more about how the Coronavirus crisis has affected your income.
f001 (concerned money wont last for life)
Do you agree or disagree with the following statement?

"I am concerned that the money I have, or will have access to, won’t last for the rest of my life."
1 Agree completely
2 Agree somewhat
3 Neither agree nor disagree
4 Disagree somewhat
5 Disagree completely
98 Don't know
f002 (household experienced a large drop in income)
Since Spring 2020, has your household experienced a large drop in income?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
f003 (best description of household income)
Since Spring 2020, which one of the following best describes your household income?
1 Roughly the same amount each month
2 Occasionally varies from month to month
3 Varies quite often from month to month
4 Have no income
98 Don't know
f004 (earned money from work)
Since Spring 2020, have you earned any money from work?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
f005 (laid off or lost job)
Since Spring 2020, have you been laid-off, terminated from, or lost your job?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
f006_intro (did not get healthcare needed because couldn't afford it)
Please indicate how often the following statements in the next two questions applied to you in the last year.
f006 (did not get healthcare needed because couldn't afford it)
Since Spring 2020, I or someone in my household did not get healthcare we needed because we couldn’t afford it.
1 Often
2 Sometimes
3 Rarely
4 Never
98 Don't know
f007 (stopped taking medication or took less due to costs)
Since Spring 2020, I or someone in my household stopped taking a medication or took less than directed due to the costs.
1 Often
2 Sometimes
3 Rarely
4 Never
98 Don't know
if bh_randomizer = 1 then
int_intro
Next we will ask you to read a short story. Carefully read the story and once you are done, you will be asked to answer a few questions.
story1_part1
Dave and Michelle, two 25-year olds, recently got married. They received $5,000 in cash as wedding presents and needed to decide what to do with the money. The answer didn’t seem obvious.

Looking over their finances didn’t take long because they didn’t have much money, especially since Michelle’s job at the time was only an internship. The two of them didn’t generally think of themselves as big planners and, at first, it seemed pointless to even consider investing for the long term. Dave suggested not investing right away and instead waiting until they had better jobs and made more money.

But Michelle told Dave about the Rule of 72. This rule approximates how many years it takes for an investment to double at a given annual rate of return. The formula is simple, as she explained: "Just divide 72 by the annual return and you’ll get the number of years it will take for your money to double."

[IWER:

Rule of 72


72 / annual rate of return = years for your money to double

It will take...

72 years for your money to double if you earn a return of 1% (72 / 1 = 72)
24 years for your money to double if you earn a return of 3% (72 / 3 = 24)
12 years for your money to double if you earn a return of 6% (72 / 6 = 12)
7.2 years for your money to double if you earn a return of 10% (72 / 10 = 7.2) ]
She noted that, with a 7% return, it would take about 10 years for their investment to double. At first, Dave wondered whether they could earn such a high return: 7% is a lot! But Michelle pointed out that they would be investing for the long term, and a diversified portfolio of stocks could yield returns in that range (even if it could go up or down).
story1_part2
This simple rule helped Michelle figure out that at a 7% annual return, the original $5,000 would grow to a whopping $160,000 by the time she and Dave turned age 75. When Michelle first pointed this out to Dave, he thought something had to be wrong with Michelle’s calculation. But, as she explained, the money grows because returns are compounded over time. In other words, all of the money including the earned return, gets reinvested every year, so that over the long term, there’s some serious build–up!
[IWER: Let’s do the math!

If Dave and Michelle earned a 7% annual return, their investment would approximately double every 10 years.

If they invested $5,000 when they were 25 years old, then:
by age 35, it would double to about:$10,000
which would double again by age 45 to about:$20,000
which would double again by age 55 to about:$40,000
which would double again by age 65 to about:$80,000
which would double again by age 75 to about:$160,000
] If Michelle and Dave waited until they were 55 years old to invest the $5,000 and earned the same 7% return, they would end up with about $20,000 by the time they were 75. And while $20,000 would be nice, the $160,000 they’d have if they invested right away would be even nicer!

Dave and Michelle decided to invest their $5,000 right away, giving it more time to grow. When their friends and family gave them $5,000, they never imagined it could turn into six figures. The young couple now understands that knowing more about compound interest and the Rule of 72 will be important for their future. Investing the money right away was the best wedding gift they could have given themselves!
r1_g1 (who earns more money)
Anna and Jessica are twins. At age 20, Jessica started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when she was age 40, she stopped adding to her savings but she left the money in the account. Anna didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Anna and Jessica earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Anna
2 Jessica
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r1_g2 (how many times amount doubled)
Jason inherited a $1,000 at age 35 from his grandparents and promised to save it for his retirement. He invested it in a stock mutual fund with an annual return of 7%. He is now 65 years old. How many times did his initial amount double since he invested at age 35? Select one choice.
1 2 times
2 3 times
3 10 times
98 Don't know
r1_g3 (investment stocks advice)
Suppose you are advising an old friend who wants to invest $50,000 in stocks, but he prefers not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your friend? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r1_g4 (which job choose)
Jacob has two job offers to choose from and he wants to select the job with a salary that will afford him the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B will not provide a raise for the next few years. If Jacob chooses Job A, he will live in City A. If Jacob chooses Job B, he will live in City B. Jacob finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on his concerns about standard of living, what should Jacob do? Select one response.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: he will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r1_g5 (after 5 years how much in account)
Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2% per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow?
1 More than $102
2 Exactly $102
3 Less than $102
98 Don’t know
r1_g6 (how many years to pay off loan)
Suppose you owe $1,000 on a loan and the interest rate you are charged is 20% per year compounded annually. If you didn’t pay anything off, at this interest rate, how many years would it take for the amount you owe to double?
1 Less than 2 years
2 At least 2 years but less than 5 years
3 At least 5 years but less than 10 years
4 At least 10 years
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 2 then
int_intro
Next we will ask you to read a short story. Carefully read the story and once you are done, you will be asked to answer a few questions.
story2_part1
Kate and her husband Sam are discussing what they could do with some money they recently got from selling their car. Kate suggests that they could invest it in the stock market to get a higher return, compared to what they would get from just putting it in a bank account.

At first, Sam didn’t understand why just putting money somewhere safe isn’t good enough. But Kate reminded him that, when they invested for the long term, they needed to take some risk. Otherwise, there’s no way to make their money grow, because the average amount of money an investment earns over the long run is related to the riskiness of the investment. Riskier investments tend to earn higher returns, while less risky investments earn lower returns. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that riskier investments are better, since riskier investments also stand a chance of losing money. In other words, there’s a trade-off between risk and return.

Kate explained to Sam that every type of investment has some degree of risk. At the same time, he wants to avoid a total wipeout and losing everything he owns all at once. For example, if he owned stock in just one company, then he’s relying on the performance of just that one company. If it went bankrupt or even just lost money, his investment would be affected, too. As Kate explained, "that’s why it’s important to invest in a mix of assets and not put all your money in one place."
story2_part2
Next, Sam told Kate that he was thinking about investing in the company where he works, since the company’s growing and Sam is confident it’s doing well. Kate wonders if he’s been listening to her at all! She tells him that the whole point of putting his money in several different companies is that, if something unexpectedly bad happened to one of them, he’ll be cushioned to a certain degree. But if Sam invested only in the company where he worked and that company tanked, both his job and his investments would be in trouble. That’s where not putting all your eggs in one basket comes in: you shouldn’t have your investments and your job tied to the same company, and you shouldn’t have all of your money invested in one company. Instead, spread it around.

Kate asked Sam to think about the following scenario: What if he invested in several different companies that all manufactured umbrellas, and all of a sudden, the value of umbrellas crashed? That might sound unlikely, but think about when the tech bubble burst or when the real estate market collapsed. Therefore, it’s smart to invest in many different kinds of companies. Basically, you want the ups and downs of each investment to be as unrelated to other investments as possible, so that if some do badly, others will offset those losses.

Sam realized that he now understood the saying "don’t put all your eggs in one basket" when it comes to investments. Learning this rule, he now sees, will be important for his financial future.
r2_g1 (investment stocks advice)
Suppose you are advising an old friend who wants to invest $50,000 in stocks, but he prefers not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your friend? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r2_g2 (investment advice for bonus)
Imagine your spouse just got a $5,000 bonus from AllWell Inc., the company she works for, because she helped develop a new drug that she believes will be very useful. She is thinking about investing the bonus in the stock market to help build her retirement account, but she has never invested before. Which option would you recommend to her? Select one choice.
1 Investing the bonus in AllWell Inc
2 Investing the bonus in a health care index fund that tracks the performance of 340 health care stocks
3 Investing the bonus in a diverse fund that holds shares of companies across the energy, financial services, health care, leisure, and technology sector
98 Don't know
r2_g3 (who earns more money)
Anna and Jessica are twins. At age 20, Jessica started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when she was age 40, she stopped adding to her savings but she left the money in the account. Anna didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Anna and Jessica earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Anna
2 Jessica
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r2_g4 (which job choose)
Jacob has two job offers to choose from and he wants to select the job with a salary that will afford him the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B will not provide a raise for the next few years. If Jacob chooses Job A, he will live in City A. If Jacob chooses Job B, he will live in City B. Jacob finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on his concerns about standard of living, what should Jacob do? Select one response.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: he will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r2_g5 (buying single stock safer return than mutual fund)
Buying a single company's stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.
1 True
2 False
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 3 then
int_intro
Next we will ask you to read a short story. Carefully read the story and once you are done, you will be asked to answer a few questions.
story3_part1
This is the story of how a very cute plaid shirt inspired Lisa to save more for the future. Lisa and Beth were shopping together when Beth spotted the shirt and knew it would look great on Lisa. But when Lisa saw it, she had a flashback to the 1990’s, the last time plaid shirts were trendy. The new shirt cost $50 and Lisa remembered paying $30 for similar shirts back then. So the word 'inflation' popped into Lisa’s head.

Inflation describes price increases over time. Lisa realized that not only do shirts that used to cost $30 now cost $50, but many things that used to be $30 now cost more. With inflation, the same number of dollars buys less. So the price of a shirt, as well as other things like haircuts and groceries, can rise.

Imagine that inflation is 4% per year: this means that prices rise 4% every year. An item that costs $100 at the beginning of a year will then cost $104 at the end of that year. This might not seem like a big deal, until you consider that everything costs a bit more, on average. Therefore, if your paycheck doesn’t grow at the same rate, you won’t be able to buy as much as you used to at the higher prices.
story3_part2
When Lisa had her plaid shirt 'aha' moment, she realized that prices had risen, and that they're probably going to be even higher in the future. Her friend Beth understood that part, too. But Beth couldn't figure out how the same shirt could go all the way from $30 in the 1990’s to $50 now, when it feels like prices rise only a little each year.

Lisa explained that this happens because price increases build upon one another. Let’s say prices increased 4% every year for 20 years. A $100 bag of groceries will cost $104 after one year. After 10 years, it will cost $148, and the 4% just keeps adding up to more and more money, so that after 20 years your $100 bag of groceries costs $219. In other words, your $100 groceries cost more than twice as much 20 years later.

Lisa knows that, when she thinks about how much money she’ll need for the future, she must also take into account how much more things will cost. Reminded by her new shirt, she’s happy to have understood inflation, and she recognizes that knowing more about how to manage money will be important for her financial future.
r3_g1 (which job choose)
Jacob has two job offers to choose from and he wants to select the job with a salary that will afford him the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B will not provide a raise for the next few years. If Jacob chooses Job A, he will live in City A. If Jacob chooses Job B, he will live in City B. Jacob finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on his concerns about standard of living, what should Jacob do? Select one response.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: he will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r3_g2 (son correct in investment)
Suppose you are 50 years old and are discussing three investment opportunities with your adult child. You have put aside a good sum of money and want to invest it for the next 10 years, but you want to play it safe. Your three investment choices are, a) a saving account that pays 1% per year, b) a T-bill that pays 1.5% per year, or c) a certificate of deposit that pays 2%. The current inflation rate is 2.5% and expected to stay at that level. Your son tells you that if you invest in this way, you won’t be able to afford the same things in 10 years. Which of the following is correct?
1 Your son is right
2 Your son is wrong
3 We cannot tell with this information
98 Don't know
r3_g3 (who earns more money)
Anna and Jessica are twins. At age 20, Jessica started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when she was age 40, she stopped adding to her savings but she left the money in the account. Anna didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Anna and Jessica earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Anna
2 Jessica
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r3_g4 (investment stocks advice)
Suppose you are advising an old friend who wants to invest $50,000 in stocks, but he prefers not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your friend? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r3_g5 (how much able to buy with money in account)
Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1% per year and inflation was 2% per year. After 1 year, how much would you be able to buy with the money in this account?
1 More than today
2 Exactly the same
3 Less than today
98 Don't know
elseif bh_randomizer = 4 then
r4_g1 (who earns more money)
Anna and Jessica are twins. At age 20, Jessica started contributing $20 a month to a savings account. After 20 years, when she was age 40, she stopped adding to her savings but she left the money in the account. Anna didn’t start to save until she was 40. Then, she saved $20 a month until she retired 20 years later at age 60. Suppose both Anna and Jessica earned a 6% return each year on their savings. When they both retired at age 60, who had more money? Select one choice.
1 Anna
2 Jessica
3 They had the same amount
98 Don't know
r4_g2 (how many times amount doubled)
Jason inherited a $1,000 at age 35 from his grandparents and promised to save it for his retirement. He invested it in a stock mutual fund with an annual return of 7%. He is now 65 years old. How many times did his initial amount double since he invested at age 35? Select one choice.
1 2 times
2 3 times
3 10 times
98 Don't know
r4_g3 (investment stocks advice)
Suppose you are advising an old friend who wants to invest $50,000 in stocks, but he prefers not to take a lot of risk. Which of the following strategies would you recommend to your friend? Select one choice.
1 Put all of the money in one stock
2 Put all of the money in two stocks
3 Put all of the money equally divided in 100 large firms in the United States
98 Don't know
r4_g4 (investment advice for bonus)
Imagine your spouse just got a $5,000 bonus from AllWell Inc., the company she works for, because she helped develop a new drug that she believes will be very useful. She is thinking about investing the bonus in the stock market to help build her retirement account, but she has never invested before. Which option would you recommend to her? Select one choice.
1 Investing the bonus in AllWell Inc
2 Investing the bonus in a health care index fund that tracks the performance of 340 health care stocks
3 Investing the bonus in a diverse fund that holds shares of companies across the energy, financial services, health care, leisure, and technology sector
98 Don't know
r4_g5 (which job choose)
Jacob has two job offers to choose from and he wants to select the job with a salary that will afford him the higher standard of living for the next few years. Job A offers a 3% raise every year, while Job B will not provide a raise for the next few years. If Jacob chooses Job A, he will live in City A. If Jacob chooses Job B, he will live in City B. Jacob finds that the price of goods and services today are about the same in both areas. Prices are expected to rise, however, by 4% in City A every year, and stay the same in City B.
JobRaise every yearCityExpected increase in prices
A3%A4%
BStay the sameBStay the same
Based on his concerns about standard of living, what should Jacob do? Select one response.
1 Take Job A
2 Take Job B
3 Take either one: he will be able to afford the same future standard of living in both places
98 Don't know
r4_g6 (son correct in investment)
Suppose you are 50 years old and are discussing three investment opportunities with your adult child. You have put aside a good sum of money and want to invest it for the next 10 years, but you want to play it safe. Your three investment choices are, a) a saving account that pays 1% per year, b) a T-bill that pays 1.5% per year, or c) a certificate of deposit that pays 2%. The current inflation rate is 2.5% and expected to stay at that level. Your son tells you that if you invest in this way, you won’t be able to afford the same things in 10 years. Which of the following is correct?
1 Your son is right
2 Your son is wrong
3 We cannot tell with this information
98 Don't know
End of if
bn_intro
Next, we are interested in learning more about your Social Security and retirement benefits. In this survey, we mean by "Social Security benefits" any benefits that you yourself receive or will receive from the Social Security program, including retiree, disability, spouse, or survivor benefits.
h001 (receiving social security)
Which of the following statements best describes you?
1 I receive Social Security
2 I don’t receive Social Security
3 I will never be eligible for Social Security
98 Don't know
if h001 = 1 then
h002 (age start receiving Social Security benefits)
At what age did you start receiving Social Security benefits?
18 18
19 19
20 20
21 21
22 22
23 23
24 24
25 25
26 26
27 27
28 28
29 29
30 30
31 31
32 32
33 33
34 34
35 35
36 36
37 37
38 38
39 39
40 40
41 41
42 42
43 43
44 44
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
elseif h001 = 2 then
h003 (age plan to start receiving Social Security benefits)
At what age do you plan to start receiving Social Security benefits?
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
End of if
h004 (ever received distribution or payout from employer retirement account )
Have you ever received a distribution or payout from an employer retirement account such as a pension plan (defined benefit plan) or a retirement saving account (such as 401(k), 403(b), 457 plan)?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if h004 = 1 then
ask_h008 := 2
h005 (type of pension plan or retirement account provided)
What type of pension plan or retirement account provided this distribution?

Some pension plans and retirement accounts base benefits on a formula involving age, years of service and salary, often called a defined benefit plan. Some plans base benefits on how much money has accumulated in a person's pension or retirement account, often called a defined contribution plan. Other plans use both ways of setting benefits.

Was the plan that gave you a distribution a defined benefit formula type or a defined contribution account type plan? Defined Contribution plans include 401-K, 403-B, ESOP, SRA, thrift/savings, stock/profit sharing, and money purchase plans.
1 Defined Benefit (formula)
2 Defined Contribution (account)
3 Both types
98 Don't know
if h005 in [1,3] then
h006 (type of distribution received from defined benefit plan)
What type of distribution did you receive from this defined benefit plan?
1 A monthly benefit that will continue for the rest of your life (this type of payment is called an annuity)
2 A monthly benefit that will continue for the rest of your life and the life of your spouse
3 Withdrew all of the money/received cash settlement/lump-sum
4 Withdrew some of the money
98 Don't know
if h006 in [1,2] then
h006_start (when benefit started)
When did this benefit start?
30 30
31 31
32 32
33 33
34 34
35 35
36 36
37 37
38 38
39 39
40 40
41 41
42 42
43 43
44 44
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
h006_monthly (monthly amount benefit)
About how much do you receive per month?
RANGE 0..20000
elseif h006 in [3,4] then
h006_withdrew (when benefit withdrawn)
When did you withdraw all the money?
30 30
31 31
32 32
33 33
34 34
35 35
36 36
37 37
38 38
39 39
40 40
41 41
42 42
43 43
44 44
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
h006_lumpsum (lumpsum amount benefit)
About how much money did you receive?
RANGE 0..5000000
if h006 = 4 then
h006_leave (how much left amount benefit)
About how much did you leave in the account?
RANGE 0..5000000
End of if
End of if
End of if
if h005 in [2,3] then
h007 (type of distribution received from defined contribution plan)
What type of distribution did you receive from this defined contribution plan?
1 Withdrew all of the money from the plan and purchased an annuity that will pay monthly benefits for the rest of your life
2 Withdrew all of the money from the plan and purchased an annuity that will continue to pay benefits for your life and the life of your spouse
3 Withdrew all of the money/received cash settlement/lump-sum
4 Withdrew some of the money and left the rest of the money in the retirement plan
98 Don't know
if h007 in [1,2] then
h007_withdrew (when benefit withdrawn)
When did you withdraw all the money?
30 30
31 31
32 32
33 33
34 34
35 35
36 36
37 37
38 38
39 39
40 40
41 41
42 42
43 43
44 44
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
h007_monthly (monthly amount benefit)
About how much do you receive per month?
RANGE 0..20000
elseif h007 in [3,4] then
h007_withdrew (when benefit withdrawn)
When did you withdraw all the money?
30 30
31 31
32 32
33 33
34 34
35 35
36 36
37 37
38 38
39 39
40 40
41 41
42 42
43 43
44 44
45 45
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
h007_lumpsum (lumpsum amount benefit)
About how much money did you receive?
RANGE 0..5000000
if h007 = 4 then
h007_leave (how much left amount benefit)
About how much did you leave in the account?
RANGE 0..5000000
End of if
End of if
End of if
if h005 in [1,2,3,98] OR h005 = empty then
ask_h008 := 1
End of if
Else
ask_h008 := 1
End of if
if ask_h008 = 1 then
h008 (expect to receive any money or payments from employer-provided pension plan)
Do you expect to receive any money or payments from an employer-provided pension plan or retirement account in the future?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if h008 = 1 then
h009 (age expect to start receiving benefits)
At what age do you expect to start receiving benefits from this employer-provided pension or retirement plan?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h010 (type of pension plan or retirement account provided)
What type of pension or retirement account is this plan?

Some pension plans and retirement accounts base benefits on a formula involving age, years of service and salary, often called a defined benefit plan. Some plans base benefits on how much money has accumulated in a person's pension or retirement account, often called a defined contribution plan. Other plans use both ways of setting benefits.

Is the plan from which you expect a distribution a defined benefit formula type or a defined contribution account type plan? Defined Contribution plans include 401-K, 403-B, ESOP, SRA, thrift/savings, stock/profit sharing, and money purchase plans.
1 Defined Benefit (formula)
2 Defined Contribution (account)
3 Both types
98 Don't know
if h010 in [1,3] then
h011 (type of distribution expect to receive from defined benefit plan)
What type of distribution do you expect to receive from this defined benefit plan?
1 An annuity that pays a monthly benefit for the rest of your life
2 An annuity that pays a benefit that will continue for your life and the life of your spouse
3 Monthly payments for a fixed number of years
4 Withdraw all of the money/receive cash settlement/lump-sum
98 Don't know
if h011 in [1,2] then
h011_start (when benefit expected to start)
When do you expect the benefit to start?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h011_monthly (expected monthly amount benefit)
About how much do you expect to receive per month?
RANGE 0..20000
elseif h011 in [3,4] then
if h011 = 3 then
h011_start (when benefit expected to start)
When do you expect the benefit to start?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
if h011_start = response then
h011_minimum := h011_start
Else
h011_minimum := 46
End of if
h011_end (when benefit expected to end)
When do you expect the benefit to end?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h011_monthly (expected monthly amount benefit)
About how much do you expect to receive per month?
RANGE 0..20000
Else
h011_withdraw_when (when benefit expect to receive)
When do you expect to receive this money?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
h011_lumpsum (lumpsum amount benefit)
About how much money will you receive?
RANGE 0..5000000
h011_leave (how much plan to leave amount benefit)
About how much will you leave in the plan?
RANGE 0..5000000
End of if
End of if
End of if
if h010 in [2,3] then
h012 (type of distribution expect to receive from defined contribution plan)
What type of distribution do you plan to take from this defined contribution plan?
1 Withdraw all of the money and buy an annuity that will pay a benefit for the rest of your life
2 Withdraw all of the money and buy an annuity that will pay a benefit for the rest of your life and that of your spouse
5 Withdraw all the money and use some of it to buy an annuity
3 Withdraw all of the money/receive cash settlement/lump-sum
4 Withdraw some of the money leaving the rest in the retirement account
98 Don't know
if h012 in [1,2,5] then
h012_withdraw_when (when expected to withdraw)
When do you expect to do this?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h012_monthly (expected monthly amount benefit)
How much do you expect to receive per month?
RANGE 0..20000
elseif h012 in [3,4] then
if h012 = 3 then
h012_withdraw_when (when expected to withdraw)
When do you expect to do this?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h012_lumpsum (how much expect to receive lumpsum)
About how much money do you expect to receive?
RANGE 0..5000000
elseif h012 = 4 then
h012_withdraw_some_when (when expected to withdraw some money)
When do you expect to receive this money?
46 46
47 47
48 48
49 49
50 50
51 51
52 52
53 53
54 54
55 55
56 56
57 57
58 58
59 59
60 60
61 61
62 62
63 63
64 64
65 65
66 66
67 67
68 68
69 69
70 70
71 71
72 72
73 73
74 74
75 75
76 76
77 77
78 78
79 79
80 80
81 81
82 82
83 83
84 84
85 85
h012_withdraw (lumpsum amount benefit)
About how much money do you expect to withdraw?
RANGE 0..5000000
h012_leave (how much expect to leave amount benefit)
About how much money will you leave in the plan?
RANGE 0..5000000
End of if
End of if
End of if
End of if
End of if
i_intro
The next set of questions is about your experience with the COVID-19 virus and any financial consequences that may have resulted from it.
i001 (been tested for the COVID-19 virus)
Since Spring 2020, have you been tested for the COVID-19 virus?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
i002 (did you or member family get sick with COVID-19 virus)
Since Spring 2020, did you or a member of your family get sick with the COVID-19 virus?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
i003 (have been vaccinated)
The government has established a campaign to vaccinate against the COVID-19 virus. Have you been vaccinated?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if i003 = 2 then
i004 (why not vaccinated)
Why haven't you been vaccinated?
1 I haven’t had an opportunity to be vaccinated yet but I will when I can
2 I don't want to be vaccinated
98 Don't know
End of if
i005 (you or other household members received any stimulus money)
Have you or other household members received any stimulus money from the Federal Government as a result of COVID-19, either in 2020 or in 2021?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if i005 = 1 then
Group of questions presented on the same screen
i006 (how much stimuls received or expected to receive)
About how much have you or other household members received or expect to receive? Your best guess is fine.
RANGE 0..10000
i006_dk (dont know how much stimuls received or expected to receive)
98 Don't know
i006_script
End of group of questions
Group of questions presented on the same screen
i007 (what done with stimulus money)
What did you do with the money? Please check as many as apply.
1 Spent it for current expenses
2 Used it to pay down debt
3 Used it to buy a car or an appliance
4 Saved it
5 Gave it to my children or parents
6 Gave it to relatives or neighbors
7 Donated it
8 Other, briefly list:
98 Don't know
i007_other (other what done with stimulus money)
STRING
End of group of questions
End of if
i008 (how often track spending)
How often do you keep track of your actual spending? Would you say:
1 Always
2 Mostly
3 Rarely
4 Never
98 Don't know
i009 (changed spending due to covid)
Have you changed your spending tracking because of COVID-19?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
i010 (how often set budget)
How often do you set budget targets for your spending? Would you say:
1 Always
2 Mostly
3 Rarely
4 Never
98 Don't know
j001 (ever participated in financial education class)
Have you ever participated in a financial education class or program offered in high school or college, in the workplace, or by an organization or institution where you lived or worked?
1 Yes
2 No, was offered one but did not participate
3 No, was never offered one
98 Don't know
j002 (received financial guidance from a professional advisor or advisory service)
Within the past two years, have you received financial guidance from a professional advisor or advisory service?
1 Yes
2 No
98 Don't know
if sizeof(j003_order) = 0 then
j003_order := shuffleArray(array(1 => 1, 2 => 2, 3 => 3))
j003_order[4] := 98
End of if
j003 (what indicates the highest probability of getting a particular disease)
Which of the following indicates the highest probability of getting a particular disease?
1 There is a one-in-twenty chance of getting the disease
2 2% of the population will get the disease
3 25 out of every 1,000 people will get the disease
98 Don't know
CS_001 (HOW PLEASANT INTERVIEW)
Could you tell us how interesting or uninteresting you found the questions in this survey?
1 Very interesting
2 Interesting
3 Neither interesting nor uninteresting
4 Uninteresting
5 Very uninteresting
CS_003 (comments)
Do you have any other comments on the survey? Please type these in the box below. (If you have no comments, please click next to complete this survey.)
STRING